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Fish

Humpback chub. Photo by Randall D. Babb.
Humpback chub. Photo by Randall D. Babb.

The following is a document archive for the native fish of the Colorado River, which have the highest rate of jeopardy toward extinction in the nation. Read article here.

Historically, the native fish fauna of the Colorado River Basin was dominated by the minnow (cyprinids) and sucker (catostomids) families. Of the 34 known native species to the Colorado River basin, 74% are found nowhere else in the world, or endemic.

Threats to these species include streamflow regulation and habitat modification, altered food web, predation by nonnative fish species, parasitism, hybridization with other native fish species, and pesticides, toxins and pollutants. These changes to the river environment have occurred so quickly that the species have been unable to a adapt, so pro-active human intervention is the only hope they have. Since the river is truncated by 83 dams in the upper basin and 10 dams in the lower basin, this loss of genetic diversity will also impede their recovery.

DIGITIZED LIBRARY of Dr. W. L. Minckley. Native Fish Lab. (Most excellent resource library)

ARIZONA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES Document Library

SEARCH ENGINE of US Fish and Wildlife Service

DOCUMENTS AND PUBLICATIONS. Upper Colorado River Endangered Fish Recovery Program

Click here to view bibliographies of endangered fish research

Citizen's Guide to NEPA

Section 7 Consultation Handbook

Regulations for implementing the procedural provisions of NEPA 

NEPA 101. Dinah Bear.

Climate Change Effects Proposed Actions Effects On Proposed Actions Under NEPA. Dinah Bear.

DESIGNATED CRITICAL HABITATS

  1. Green River from Gates of Lodore (Dinosaur National Monument) to the Colorado River confluence, Colorado and Utah.
  2. Yampa River in Dinosaur National Monument, Colorado.
  3. White River from Rio Blanco Lake Dam to the Green River confluence, Colorado and Utah.
  4. Duchesne River from river mile 2.5 to Green River Confluence, Utah.
  5. Colorado River from Colorado River Bridge (I-70, exit 90 in Rifle) to North Wash (Lake Powell), Colorado and Utah.
  6. Gunnison River from the confluence of the Uncompahgre River to the Colorado River confluence, Colorado.
  7. San Juan River from State Route 371 Bridge (Farmington) to Neskahai Canyon (Lake Powell), New Mexico, Colorado and Utah.
  8. Colorado River from confluence of Paria River to Imperial Dam, Arizona, Nevada and California.
  9. Little Colorado River from river mile 8 to Colorado River confluence.
  10. Gila River from New Mexico border to Coolidge Dam, Arizona.
  11. Salt River from Highway 60 Bridge to Roosevelt Diversion Dam.
  12. Verde River from boundary of Prescott National Forest to Horseshoe Dam.

Note: Includes 100-year river floodplain and full pool elevation of reservoirs. Lake Powell is not critical habitat except for the uppermost arms of San Juan and Colorado rivers. Total river mileage is 1,980.

 

ACADEMIC RECOVERY PLANS

Lower Colorado River

Gila River Basin

BIOLOGICAL OPINIONS/MEMOS by US Fish and Wildlife Service unless specified.

FLOW RECOMMENDATIONS

LISTING IN THE FEDERAL REGISTER

  1. 1994 - Designation of critical habitat in Colorado River Basin
  2. Colorado pikeminnow - March 11, 1967 (32 FR 4001)
  3. humpback chub - March 11, 1967 (32 FR 4001)
  4. bonytail chub - April 23, 1980 (45 FR 27713)
  5. razorback sucker - October 23, 1991 (56 FR 54957)

COLORADO RIVER AND ITS TRIBUTARIES

Colorado River Mainstem

Upper Colorado River

Gunnison River

Dolores River

Green River

Yampa River

Canyonlands (Southeast Utah Group)

Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (Lake Powell)

San Juan River

Grand Canyon  

Lower Colorado River

       Multiple Species Conservation Program

Salton Sea

Gulf of California, Delta and Limitrophe

GRAPHICS

INVENTORY

PHOTOS

  1. Colorado squawfish (Ptychocheilus lucius) (photo)
  2. humpback chub (Gila cypha) (photo) (close-up not public domain)
  3. bonytail chub (Gila elegans) (photo)
  4. razorback sucker (Xyrauchen texanus) (photo)

Photos for detailed identification

PRESS

RECOVERY GOALS

Five-year Reviews

UPPER COLORADO RIVER RECOVERY & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM (RIP)
SAN JUAN RIVER BASIN RECOVERY & IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAM

FISH SPECIES

Razorback Sucker

2014 - Conservation to Stem Imminent Extinction: The Fight to Save Razorback Sucker in Lake Mojave and Its Implications. Marsh et al.

OTHER

A CHRONOLOGY OF PUBLIC COMMENTS (under construction)

Additional reading


 





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